Tag Archives: dad

Happy 70th birthday, NHS, and thank you

Thank you for delivering me safely to my parents.
Thanks for all the eye tests and glasses.
Thanks for making sure I had healthy teeth despite my attempts to avoid brushing.
Thanks for looking after my sisters as they gave life to my nieces and nephews.
Thanks especially for nurturing the twins when they entered the world.
Thanks for saving my Dad’s life.
Thanks for helping our family through my Dad’s journey with dementia.
Thanks for saving my life. Twice.
Thank you for safely delivering my two wonderful children into the world.
Thanks for saving the lives of many of my friends, multiple times.

Thank you for doing all this for free.
Thank you for making sure we’re a healthy nation.
Thank you to all the staff for being so committed to doing the very best you can for patients, sometimes under immense pressure, with insufficient resources and inadequate pay. You are all heroes.

 

Fight Dementia

On Saturday I’ll be going for a walk, and I need your help.

With me will be – at least – sixteen members of my family, all doing the Alzheimer’s memory walk in remembrance of my Dad.

Amazingly we’ve already beaten our target of raising £500 for the Alzheimer’s Society. The charity helps people with dementia and their families to deal with the effects that this horrible, incurable disease has. They also help fund research into the condition in the hopes that we might find a cure one day.

However, I want to raise much more than that. Here’s why…

Figures compiled just two years ago show that while combined government and charitable funding for cancer research reached £544 million, just £90m was spent on dementia research. The figures for coronary heart disease and stroke were £166m and £56m respectively. In contrast, the combined health and social care costs for dementia totalled £11.6 billion – more than cancer (£5bn), stroke (£2.9bn) and heart disease (£2.5bn) combined.

Dementia is a devastating incurable disease that causes a huge amount of suffering for families affected. Unless you’ve been through it it’s hard to articulate how painful it can be to experience.

We need more funding for the invaluable support the Alzheimer’s Society provides, and for the scientific research to end this disease once and for all.

Will you help me, by sponsoring me and my kids, Mom, sisters, brother-in-law, nieces, nephews, aunties and cousins to do the memory walk this Saturday and help us fight Dementia?

Donate here.

Tagging Alzheimer’s Sufferers

Having a Dad with Pick’s disease my eye was caught this morning by a headline from the BBC, charity supports dementia tagging, which reports the news that the Alzheimer’s society has given its approval to the use of electronic tagging of dementia sufferers.

I knew why instantly without reading the article – my Dad used to wander around himself and with him being a bit of a rambler he was more inclined to do so.

The idea itself sounds to me like a good one. If sufferers walk off it can be hard to track them down. We gave my Dad a cheap mobile phone so that we could call him to find out where he was. However, more often than not he’d forget it or switch it off. Even then, he rarely realised his pocket was ringing and would probably have trouble answering it despite how easy we tried to make it. In that situation a tag would have allowed us to even use a mobile phone to find out where he is and pick up him. I remember one morning, driving around our village looking for him because he’d gone out when he was supposed to be at home waiting to be picked up for his visit to the day centre.

There is another big concern though. The normal dangers of everyday life, such as traffic, are magnified with dementia sufferers. One particular example that comes to mind is the time my Dad stepped out in front of a moving car because he recognised the driver. She had to break suddenly to avoid hitting him. My Dad was completely oblivious to the danger of doing something like that, such was the effect of the disease. A tag would do nothing to allay fears of similar or more disasterous events taking place.

An idea did come to my mind though. A tagging system could work very well in a ‘controlled community’ – a sort of cross between a care home and sheltered housing. With care homes, patients are very restricted in their movements. Using tags could allow patients to wander more within a larger space whilst close enough to supervision to enable the level of care needed. In a such a place, technology such as RFID could be used instead of GPS, tracking movement in and out of individual rooms and proximity to the perimeter of the ‘community’.