All posts by philipjohn

I'm a WordPress developer most of the time, building awesome things for awesome people. I also like to do political type things, especially when technology is involved. I am a secular atheist, a father and a cyclist (MTB trails and road). Other than that I eat (fast) and read books.

Intel: Choose Us, We’ll Screw with Your Computer

Intel haven’t actually said anything like that but what impression do they really expect to give, with this ad?:

Screenshot of an Intel advert

When it first loads up you see the rather evil looking (okay, red and fuzzy) word “Virus” fly towards these three Matrix-types. It is quickly caught and thrown to the ground. I’m happy with that – Intel are making me think that their technology will stop viruses before they get to my laptop. Nice.

Then the unthinkable happens. As I hover over the ad, I find my mouse pointer is also thrown towards the men. The pointer is scrunched up like a drinks can (as you can see) and then thrown to the floor. Then, it fades away. I’m left with no mouse pointer. What do I do now? I can’t do anything – I’ve lost my mouse pointer! At this point my Mom would probably hit the power button (not that Intel are targeting advertising to my Mom).

So what are you telling me, Intel? If I use your technology will I no longer be able to use my mouse pointer? Are you scared those few little pixels contain a virus? Nope,  you’ve lost and annoyed me. Good job.

Finger Skating to Finger Drumming

My lovely surprise present from my girlfriend. Maybe she wants me to stop hammering the steering wheel when I’m driving!

The demo puts me to shame, for a start, having no idea how to play real drums let alone a finger drum kit! It’s great fun though! I can just hit that little “D” button and pretend to my hearts content that I’m a whizz on the finger drum kit and therefore must be an amazing drummer when sat in front of a real drum kit.

I can’t wait to have friends round!

One Vote Every Four Years is All We Get

A while ago I signed a petition on the Prime Ministers website asking for the government to introduce legislation that would empower ordinary citizens to call a referendum on important matters. According to the petition details a system, called Citizens’ Initiatives, exists in Switzerland, New Zealand, Hungary and 24 states in America.

The petition asks that a referendum be called on an issue when a petition is signed by 2.5% of the population. For national issues this would be the entire UK population, with 2.5% being around one million, and for regional issues about 3-4,000.

The governments response posted today states that powers already exist for local councils to hold referendums and have access to the full electoral register in order to do so. On the issue of national referendums, the response states that The Political Parties Elections and Referendums Act 2000 allows government to call national referendums but “does not however set out any criteria for using referendums.”

The government is obviously guilty in this instance of not listening to the public. The petition clearly asks for “legislation allowing citizens to trigger referendums” not allowing government to trigger referendums. It’s about real democracy – giving the public the power to show they are unhappy and make sure something is done. All that the public can do at the moment is shout and even that has been limited by legislation like the Serious Orgnaised Crime and Police Act 2005.

Not only is it disturbing that the power to trigger referendums lies solely with government but that it is a government led by an unelected Prime Minister. I know many would say that we elect parties, not the prime minister, but how can we accept that we have no say in who leads our country especially when the new prime minister has already started undoing the work of his predecessor.

If you’re interested in this issue I suggest a trip to the site for the Campaign for Direct Democracy.

Tagging Alzheimer’s Sufferers

Having a Dad with Pick’s disease my eye was caught this morning by a headline from the BBC, charity supports dementia tagging, which reports the news that the Alzheimer’s society has given its approval to the use of electronic tagging of dementia sufferers.

I knew why instantly without reading the article – my Dad used to wander around himself and with him being a bit of a rambler he was more inclined to do so.

The idea itself sounds to me like a good one. If sufferers walk off it can be hard to track them down. We gave my Dad a cheap mobile phone so that we could call him to find out where he was. However, more often than not he’d forget it or switch it off. Even then, he rarely realised his pocket was ringing and would probably have trouble answering it despite how easy we tried to make it. In that situation a tag would have allowed us to even use a mobile phone to find out where he is and pick up him. I remember one morning, driving around our village looking for him because he’d gone out when he was supposed to be at home waiting to be picked up for his visit to the day centre.

There is another big concern though. The normal dangers of everyday life, such as traffic, are magnified with dementia sufferers. One particular example that comes to mind is the time my Dad stepped out in front of a moving car because he recognised the driver. She had to break suddenly to avoid hitting him. My Dad was completely oblivious to the danger of doing something like that, such was the effect of the disease. A tag would do nothing to allay fears of similar or more disasterous events taking place.

An idea did come to my mind though. A tagging system could work very well in a ‘controlled community’ – a sort of cross between a care home and sheltered housing. With care homes, patients are very restricted in their movements. Using tags could allow patients to wander more within a larger space whilst close enough to supervision to enable the level of care needed. In a such a place, technology such as RFID could be used instead of GPS, tracking movement in and out of individual rooms and proximity to the perimeter of the ‘community’.